Rosemary Miso Squash Soup

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Is autumn here yet? The leaves are starting to change here in Northern California, but the weather is unsure of its self. One day its 80 degrees out and the next its 50 and overcast. Usually, this time of year tends to feel like a never ending summer, especially the closer you get to the Bay. But autumn is surely making its way in. The light has that fall glow, the days are getting shorter and our bodies are yearning to slow down.

For most of us, slowing down is a true privilege and luxury but the more we can find time to be still and relax the more balance we will have during vata season. In traditional healing modalities like Ayurveda, fall is the time of air + ether. We see this reflected in nature with the leaves changing and falling, dry days and cooler weather. In order to balance this dryness, we need foods and herbs that are the opposite—sweet, warming + moistening.

This is the time of year to bust out that jar of ghee, buy all the squashes and lean on soups and stews for the deepest form of nourishment. When I talk to people about Ayurveda, I usually get a confused look when sharing about doshas or constitutions. The ancient language of Sanskrit seems to intimidate some, but as soon as its broken down to the elements—cold/wet/hot/dry— a relief flows over and understanding can happen. While respecting tradition is super important, especially teaching as a white woman, elemental forms of healing are a living breathing system. We must make them applicable to the modern age, otherwise they aren’t going to serve people towards wanting to heal themselves.

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One of the quickest ways to heal digestive issues is by making your own food. I’ve found this to be the most true in my own journey and its why Summer and I created The Kosmic Kitchen in the first place. That’s why I’m always looking for simple nourishing recipes that don’t require a lot of fuss. Soups are amazing in terms of coming together quickly and being deeply satisfying. They’re cozy food for the bones.

This Rosemary Miso Squash Soup came together after I picked up my most favorite squash of the season, Red Kuri. If you are lucky enough have it where you live, I urge you to try it. Miso is a great ally for this time of year when ferments like sauerkraut can be a bit on the drying side. All together this soup can be made in under an hour and kept in the fridge for breakfast, lunch or dinner left overs.


INGREDIENTS

1 small Red Kuri Squash

1 onion, diced

1 potato, diced with skin on

1 inch knob of ginger, minced

2 tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped

2 apples, skin on, cored + diced

1 cinnamon stick

1/4 cup white miso paste

1 quart good stock or water (chicken stock, mushroom or veggie stock )

good grey sea salt + fresh ground black pepper


METHOD

Preheat your oven to 350. Cut the squash in half and place seed side down on a parchment lined baking sheet. Bake for about 30 minutes or until tender + easily pierced with a fork. While the squash is roasting, heat a heavy bottom dutch oven (or soup pot), on medium. Add in a tablespoon of fat, we like ghee for this recipe, and add in the onions, potato, apples, rosemary, ginger + cinnamon stick. Let the onions + apples soften while the herbs + spices become fragrant.

Make your miso broth by adding 1/4 cup white miso to small bowl and pouring over a few tablespoons of hot water (not boiling) and whisking until smooth and set aside. This will prevent the miso from becoming lumpy in the soup.

Once the squash is cooked, let it cool for a few minutes then carefully scoop out the seeds and add it to the pot, skin and all! Just make sure to remove any bits of the stem that remain. Pour over your broth or water just enough to cover everything and bring to a simmer. Let the soup simmer for about 15 minutes then take it off the heat. Now, add in your whisked miso and stir to combine. Remove the cinnamon stick and blend the soup to a creamy consistency with a hand blender or in batches in a Vitamix. Add salt + pepper to taste then serve.

Makes about 6-8 servings. ,


 

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